Do You Or Your Child Struggle With Worry?

Here is a handy little strategy for taming your inner worrier. Postpone your worrying to your allocated worry time. Say to yourself or your child, "we can take time to worry about this during the scheduled worry time".

Choose a daily time and place to worry. Think about how much time you would need (no more than 30 mins).

Make sure the place is comfortable and the time is not too close to bedtime.

When you notice a worry pop up during the day, write it down in a notepad or even on your phone. You may wish to create a WORRY BOX for younger children, where they can write down or even draw their worries and then store them in the box until the scheduled worry time.

Redirect your attention to whatever you were doing before the worry thought popped up. When the scheduled worry time comes around, go to your allocated worry place. Spend time only worrying about the things you or your child has written down throughout the day, and cross off any worries that may no longer be relevant. Do not go over your allocated worry time, and do not put pressure on yourself to problem solve. Say to yourself or to your child, “This 15-30 minute block is for worry time, and I/you will do my/your best to not put attention on these worries outside of this time each day.”

If you notice worries popping up outside the scheduled worry time, remind yourself or your child to write the worry down and then to let go of those thoughts until the next designated worry period. In other words – postpone your worry until the scheduled worry time.

The more you practice, the more you will be able to choose when and for how long worry thoughts linger. This increases a sense of confidence, control and helps with emotional regulation.

Commit to practising this for a few days, then a few more, and keep going!

Better Self Psychology specialises in helping children, teenagers, and young adults.

More Articles

Better Self Psychology Positive Thinking Girl
Self Improvement

4 Tips for Living Mindfully

Mindfulness is a form of meditation where you focus on being intensely aware of what you’re sensing and feeling in the moment and can help us in many ways. Mindful living can aid in feelings of calmness, reduce anxieties and lift our overall mood.

Better Self Psychology What To Expect When Seeing A Psychologist
Knowledge

What To Expect When Coming To See A Psychologist

What can I expect from my first session with my psychologist? Seeing a new psychologist for the first time can be a daunting experience. The first session with your psychologist is primarily an assessment session.

Knowledge

Managing Risk

Is someone you care about thinking about suicide? It can be very distressing when we are worried about the safety of somebody we care about.